Alice’s #LOLmythesis for July’s #scicommchall

Alice replied to this month’s #LOLmythesis scicommchall on her (brilliant!) Instagram by posting the picture above and the text below:
“This months #scicommchall is all about summarizing your work, project or thesis in one sentence. It’s all about trivializing the most important thing you’re doing right now. If you think it’s sad that I can sum up my thesis in one sentence and it sounds stupid then you’re probably right. But I do hope that you realize that there is so much more to it then just this one sentence. I like how this challenge lightened up my view of my thesis.
And by the way: teachers entering a professional development course on using IBL as a means to address diversity already have strong beliefs about the topic. This is why it’s so hard to change their beliefs. What a surprise.
#phdlife #phdjourney #LOLmythesis #scicomm#sciencecommunication #tuesdaythoughts #womeninstem #womeninscience #teacherbeliefs #scienceeducationresearch”

Alice shares how she’s always on the lookout for phenomena that excite her

For the #makingitallaboutmytopic challenge, Alice shares how she’s always on the lookout for phenomena that excite her:

“Every year during the last week of June, there‘s the Kiel Week. And on the sports field really close to my home, the balloons start and land and there’s a show five times during the week. Yesterday, I’ve been there for the first time and loved it!

But while watching the show, I noticed something I wanted to see all month: take a look at the sky behind the balloons! These noctilucent clouds are just beautiful. Funny enough they are not really clouds but ice crystals being highlighted by the setting sun in such an angle, that the sun has set a couple of hours before but is still shining on the ice crystals in the upper atmosphere of Earth. I was so excited about this phenomenon that I almost instantly had to talk to my friends who were there with me and just wanted to enjoy the show. I explained them how these clouds aren’t visible in daylight, as they are the highest and faintest of all clouds, located about 80km above the Earth.

I almost instantly had to think of this month’s #scicommchall. This is something I recently developed and that has not always been there. Looking out for phenomena that excite me and trying to explain them has especially come from my #experimentalfriday series and I enjoy this new look on the world a lot. I hope you do too.”

A giveaway that works well for scicomm? Alice’s popsicle stick wave is such a great idea!

Such a fun giveaway with tons of scicomm potential suggested by Alice for April’s scicommchall on her awesome Instagram @scied_alice — and she even included a “how to” on her blog! Doesn’t this make you want to start playing right away? (And also: follow Alice on Twitter @Alice_in_SciEd!)
Alice writes:
“Have you ever tried a popsicle stick wave? For every popsicle stick added to the chain, there is some elastic potential energy added. When the chain is released, all that elastic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy, resolving into a motion that resembles a wave. Just look at the slow motion video, where you can only see a small chain released and think of the chain reaction when a huge amount of sticks is connected!
And by the way – that is my #scicommchall giveaway! Obviously, I‘d also include a booklet with instructions on how to set up the wave and an explanation of the phenomenon. And off it would go – the perfect SciComm giveaway for my 200th post! Keep an eye open for that special occasion!”

A concept cartoon about teachers’ reasons not to implement Inquiry-Based Learning

Alice is sharing her contribution to March’s #scicommchall on her Instagram @scied_alice (which you should totally check out!). She writes:

“I‘m finally submitting my concept cartoon for this months #scicommchall – and it‘s about teachers‘ reasons NOT to implement Inquiry-Based Learning and addressing diversity. All of those reasons are hindering factors and are totally legitimate. They‘re not excuses but subjective perceptions of the situation in which teachers assess their opportunities for action. It‘s my job to find those factors influencing the teachers‘ beliefs and their self-efficacy and to convince policy makers and educators of the importance of addressing those factors.”