What’s in Mirjam’s bag? January’s #scicommchall!

For January’s #scicommchall, we are doing a “what’s in your science bag?” thing! Mirjam writing:

I am excited! Some of my stuff might actually be specific to my #wavewatching and #kitchenoceanography obsessions. Or they might not be, you tell me: What’s in YOUR bag and why?

In any case, here we go with mine:

  1. This is my absolute favourite handbag of all times! It’s always stuffed, but I love it! I carry this on me wherever I go, and my work bag comes in addition to this (give me a shout if you would want to see that one, too). All the stuff around it in the picture usually lives inside
  2. Not so surprising: A little card holder with all the cards I need to carry
  3. And a little coin pouch
  4. Emergency tea. Can’t get caught anywhere without some. Clearly have to restock, this is my least favourite of the favourites I usually carry with me. Also great as dye tracer in a pickle
  5. A spork. Because no single-use plastic! Also for stirring, measuring, that kind of stuff in experiments (we use food dyes, no worries…)
  6. I carry some minerals to prevent (or quickly counteract) cramps. No oceanography connection there
  7. Seem to have skipped no 7 on the picture! Probably to make up for something not pictured, because I was working with it when I decided to accept this challenge and it therefore wasn’t in my handbag: My (tiny) bullet journal
  8. Pens! Several. One waterproof, because #kitchenoceanography. Where is my pencil? Seems to have gotten lost
  9. Sticky notes! Always need them
  10. My battery bank for my phone, because my phone holds my life. And I need it to take pictures and movies, to write notes, to do Social Media with it or blog on it. The battery bank is heavy, but for me totally worth always carrying it with me
  11. Headphones, charging cables for my phone & battery bank, that kinda stuff
  12. Oh, now it’s getting interesting! A selfie stick and a microphone for my phone to do wave watching selfie videos with, after I realized how horrible the sound quality was when I was on a Swedish research ship a couple of months ago
  13. A fabric bag because I always end up having to carry stuff somewhere and, as you see, the handbag is tiny
  14. Ziploc bags. Because you always find cool stuff at the beach… At least I do 🙂
  15. Emergency cash and emergency plasters
  16. The pouch where the plasters are supposed to be, together with some emergency stuff against headaches, a tiny pocket knife (which I use SO MUCH!) and the very much undervalued lip balm. Which has saved tank experiments several tanks when something was leaking, everybody was freaking out, and I was just like “let me get my lip balm from my hand bag…”
  17. Paint swatches that I got when my nieces and I went to the crafts store because we had the deal that everybody could get three and only three, and I decided that “everybody” should include me 😉
  18. A small scarf and wooly hat, because wave watching happens outside and I like my throat and ears to be warm
  19. A measuring tape. Because knitting, and then I forgot it was there

And what’s in your bag?

Drawing our motivation: “Science isn’t finished until it’s communicated” by Sir Mark Walport

The other day, I wanted to draw a cover graphic for a networking event for online science communicators, but needed a quote for inspiration that would also set the tone for the event. And I am so happy I found exactly that!

What would it look like if you were to draw your motivation for your research or scicomm or any other project you are currently working on? Join September’s #scicommchall and show us!

Mirjam illustrates a quote that motivates her in her work

One of Mirjam‘s favourite ocean-related quotes is by oceanographer Dr. Miriam Goldstein “The ocean is strong and powerful and it likes to rip things up” (check out the link for a great post by Dr. Clark Richards for scientific context), here illustrated for September’s #scicommchall.

What quote inspires you in the context of your work, and how could you illustrate it? Let us know! 🙂

Motion cards for wave watching

Mirjam writing about giveaways that also work as scicomm props for April’s scicommchall:

One of my scicomm foci is wave watching: looking at the water and trying to figure out why the waves look exactly the way they do. What caused them? The wind, ships, animals? What’s the influence of the shape of the coastline or the depth distribution? That kind of stuff.

In order to discuss these kinds of questions, it’s useful to visualize wave crests (or troughs) in pictures, so everybody is talking about the same things, which is surprisingly difficult when you look at a moving water surface.

I like to annotate pictures and create gifs for my blog (like the one below) to then be able to explain things, but I am thinking that a motion card (you know? The kind of card that shows two or more pictures depending on the angle you look at them at) might be a fun way to show a similar thing. It would be small enough to carry with me to give to people at e.g. conferences, or cheap to send to people per (snail-) mail. People might like to put it up at their pin boards at work, or have it on their desks, or even send it to other people because it’s fun. And I think it could be intriguing enough that people would follow a link to read more about what’s displayed on the card and about wave watching in general. So it would be a way to get people curious about everyday physics.

What do you think? Would it work on you?

An elevator-less elevator pitch for #scicommchall. Now it’s your turn! :-)

Still not inside an elevator, but now that I have my elevator pitch down to short and sweet (and really only 30 seconds if you don’t watch the contact stuff in the end), maybe I will be able to manage to film it without being interrupted like I was the previous dozen attempts

Now it’s your turn! Share your elevator pitch with us! (And don’t worry, you can always “upgrade” it later, like I am doing here!)

January’s #scicommchall: Mirjam shares an elevator pitch!

January’s #scicommchall of doing an elevator pitch is a lot more challenging than we thought, so I am sharing one here that I am really not 100% happy with (doesn’t actually capture the essence of what I do, too long, not in an elevator [although I did try — see a video with outtakes over on my blog]), and publicly pledge to come up with a better one before the end of the month and post it here. Because I would really like to have a good elevator pitch ready for the next time I meet someone in an elevator, and to link to it for everyone interested in what I do!

Anyway, here we go:

Now it’s your turn! What does your elevator pitch look like?

Mirjam’s #scicommbookforkids for #scicommchall

A #scicommbookforkids for September’s #scicommchall on learning to observe the wind direction.

This is what the book looks like post coloring, but pre folding:

And this is what the finished book looks like:

Download available below (German & English) if you like it!

Do you think it can help kids with learning where the wind comes from (and why anyone should want to know)? I am curious what you (and your kids) think! 🙂

Click to download